Hoi-Tod Chaw-Lae Restaurant, Bangkok

We had an extended layover in Bangkok while en-route back to Singapore from Vientiane. Unlike previous trips whereby we focused on visiting a few of the famous and notable fine-dining places, we wanted to try more street food for this trip. Other reason was because eversince Asia 50 Best Restaurants was held in Bangkok this year, I’ve heard that the restaurants were packed with many eager foodies (mostly Singaporeans) resulting in the need for way advanced booking at the popular ones. We’ve covered all the restaurants in Bangkok on the list so giving them a miss this time round, although I wouldn’t mind revisiting some of them again.

The first “street-food” on my to-eat list upon touching down was Oyster Omelette at Thong Lo area. I used “street-food” with quotation marks cos I’m still apprehensive about trying stalls along the road side. I still prefer to eat in stalls that minimally has a shop space.

Hoi-Tod Chaw-Lae Restaurant_01

Despite having visited Bangkok a couple of times, I think the city is rather huge and has a large variety of food to try! My Bangkok visits are always jam-packed with non-stop eating and stuffing myself to the max, interspersed with non-stop shopping =)

I’ve been having cravings for Oyster Omelette in Singapore for quite some time. However it is always challenging to find the opportune time to enjoy this sinful (oily) delicacy… Eat it as supper and the chances of it turning into fats is also certain…Finally managed to curb my cravings while on holiday…

As a matter of fact, I walked & exercised more during holidays than on my usual work day…I think that is the norm for most Singaporeans isn’t it? Singaporeans like their itinerary to be packed, maximising our holidays…versus the Western concept of holiday = relax, chill, do nothing except soak up the sun?

After checking in to our hotel, we hopped onto the BTS and made our way to Thong Lo Station. It’s quite easy to find Hoi-Tod Chaw-Lae Restaurant, located along Sukhumvit 55. It’s only about 100 metres away from the main Sukhumvit Road.

There are a few varieties available: Hoi Tod being Mussels with Egg and Rice Flour, another versions are Oysters with Egg and Rice Flour (soft) and Oysters with Egg and Rice Flour (crispy).

Here we have the Oysters with Egg and Rice Flour (crispy) version. The freshly pan fried (or rather hot plate/tepanyaki styled) dish was packed with plump oysters, along with the aromatic egg & flour mixture. We wasted no time in gobbling down this delicious omelette. We loved the golden brown crispy and crunchy layer at the fringe of the omelette *in fact this was the 2nd plate of omelette we ordered, the first was the soft version but I felt that the crispy version was better*

Hoi-Tod Chaw-Lae Restaurant_02

We also ordered a Pad Thai from the menu thinking that we needed some noodles to fill our hungry stomachs.  Once again, this pate of Pad Thai wrapped with egg was gone in matter of minutes.

As mentioned earlier, we first tried the Oysters, Egg and Rice Flour (soft version). This is the soft version, which had less crispy crunches but more moist fluffy egg mixture.

Hoi-Tod Chaw-Lae Restaurant_03

I guessed we were eager to have some really delicious food after spending a couple of days in Laos, whereby the food were great and not as sinful (we were missing these devilish calorie-laden food)…

Extremely satisfied with my first food stop of my current Bangkok trip, we moved on in search of the other eateries on my list~

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